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Science

     The purpose of the Math and Science Academy’s Science Program is to broaden one’s understanding of scientific concepts and develop the skills of inquiry. Students will learn subject matter disciplines in the context of inquiry, technology, science in personal and social perspectives, and the history and nature of science while integrating all aspects of scientific concepts. Rather than study a broad range of general topics, students will study a few fundamental scientific concepts that will best prepare them for continued learning.

     All elements of the program are consistent with the National Science Education Standards and Benchmarks for Scientific Literacy. All content has been developed within and across grade levels to meet state-mandated goals as measured by the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments (MCA’s) Middle School and High School Science benchmarks. Subject matter is made meaningful as students practice activities that are relevant to their own lives and as they acquire information through multiple sources – educators, practice and experience, and communication with other students. Students will practice inquiring by using multiple processing skills – manipulation, cognitive, procedural – and by performing relevant short-term and extended activities that investigate and analyze science questions.

 

Required Science Courses

Life Science (6th Grade)       Earth Science (7th Grade)       Physical Science (8th Grade)     Biology (9th Grade)

 

 

Chemistry (10th Grade)                                                   AP Chemistry (10th Grade)                                           CIS Physics by Inquiry (11th or 12th Grade) or             CIS Intro to Physics (11th or 12th Grade)

Required Courses


Life Science: 6th
Students will learn subject matter disciplines in the context of inquiry, technology, science in personal and social perspectives, and history and nature of science while integrating all aspects of biological concepts consistent with State Standards, the National Science Education Standards and Benchmarks for Scientific Literacy. Rather than study a broad range of general biological topics, students will study a few fundamental scientific concepts that will best prepare them for success in AP Biology/Biological Sciences. Students will practice inquiry by using multiple processing skills – manipulation, cognitive, procedural, laboratory descriptions investigations, and by performing relevant short-term and extended activities that investigate and analyze science questions.

Earth Science: 7th
Students will investigate Earth science concepts including the nature and practice of science, Earth in space, geology, meteorology, and human interactions with Earth systems. Students will demonstrate the application of critical thinking skills to science problems and develop an awareness of basic underlying concepts that relate to or explain the natural world (systems, cycles, order, change, energy and matter, cause and effect). The course includes in-class and group activities, online learning, labs and inquiry, research projects, and other assignments.

Physical Science: 8th
Physical Science is foundational to high school chemistry and physics. This class presents a wide range of topics including scientific methods, measurements, matter, chemistry, chemical systems, motion and forces, simple machines, sound, light, and electricity. It can be mathematically intense, and the students will develop a strong conceptual understanding of Physical Science by the end of the year. The first semester is an introduction to chemistry, and the second semester will concentrate on physics.

Biology: 9th
Students enrolled in this course will learn about the living world at all levels of organization and the processes involved at those levels. To do this, students will work with concepts, theories, and principles of the living environment. Topics will include cells and cellular processes, genetics, evolution, diversity of life, body systems, and ecology. Laboratory activities and field investigations will be used to supplement student understanding of each of these topics. In addition to these topics, students will also learn about historical biology background, potential careers in the field of biology, and evaluate current biology-related issues.

General Chemistry: 10th
Chemistry is a course in which the student will investigate chemical and physical behavior of matter using the scientific method. In the laboratory the student will learn to make careful observation, seek out regularities, and attempt to provide explanations for observed behavior. The student is introduced to a fundamental understanding of chemical reactions and chemical bonding through a detailed analysis of the structure of the atom. These experiences are centered around laboratory activities with much emphasis being placed on process, observation, and evaluation of observation.


University of Minnesota Entry College in the Schools (eCIS) PsTL 1163 Physics by Inquiry: 11th - 12th
Sponsoring U of M Academic Department: College of Postsecondary Teaching and Learning
Credits: Four University of Minnesota semester credits (C- or better)
U of M requirements met with this course: Meets a U of M liberal arts requirement for science (two required) with lab. U of M Catalog Description: PsTL 1163 is a yearlong introductory physics course that tries to simulate the way scientists discover and create knowledge. The course is aimed at elementary education majors and non-science majors. About 80% of the class periods will be lab, rather than lectures. Students work in small groups to perform experiments, make observations, develop theories of how things work, and test those theories by performing further experiments. Students develop an understanding of physics concepts through doing it and talking about it with their peers and with the course staff. About 20% of the class periods will involve lecture, but again with a high level of interactivity between students. The goal of the course is not only to learn physics concepts, but knowing HOW we know them (what is the evidence for them), being able to apply them in new situations, and being able to explain them. There is a fair amount of writing involved in the course in terms of explaining one's answers, but not in the sense of papers. The course places an emphasis on learning by thinking and doing. This course is recommended for non-science/engineering majors.
Student Prerequisites: 11th or 12th grade. Limited to 24 students.

University of Minnesota College in the Schools (CIS) PHYS 1101W, Introduction to College Physics: 11th - 12th
Sponsoring U of M Academic Department: School of Physics and Astronomy
Credits: Four University of Minnesota semester credits (C- or better)
U of M requirements met with this course: First section of a two section sequenced course in algebra based introductory physics that meets one of the writing course requirements.
U of M Catalog Description: University of Minnesota, CIS Physics 1101, is a one year, 4 semester hour, algebra based introduction to college physics taught at the Math and Science Academy. The main emphasis will be on the branch of physics known as mechanics. This is the study of motion and the causes of motion through the applications of fundamental principles of physics. We begin with kinematics, the quantitative description of the motion of particles. We then build on kinematics to learn how and why motion occurs, through the application of Newton's laws of dynamics. Many examples will be considered as we explore the properties of specific forces and the details of the motion they bring about. The next step will be to describe physical processes in terms of energy and momentum, quantities that are always "conserved." Conservation laws allow us to solve problems in mechanics that would be very difficult by other techniques and provide a powerful approach to the analysis of physical systems in general. We then will extend our understanding of motion to the kinematics and dynamics of rotation. Finally, we will briefly study some of the physical properties of solids and fluids. By the end of this semester, you should have a deeper understanding of the phenomena occurring in your surrounding physical world. You should have a clearer picture of the behavior of the universe on the largest (cosmic) scale, and on the smallest (sub-nuclear) scale. In addition, you should be more competent at measurement and quantitative reasoning concerning physical processes. Prerequisites No prior physics course is assumed, but facility in algebra and basic trigonometry is essential. This course is recommended for science (including pre-med) and engineering majors.
Prerequisites : You must: be a junior or senior, be in the top 20% of your class have a grade of B or better in Algebra II (or equivalent), have a grade of B or better in Physics or Chemistry. No prior physics course is assumed, but mastery in algebra and basic trigonometry is essential. If you feel rusty you should review and practice. Chapter 1 and Appendix A in your text provide an overview of the tools you will need.
Limited to 25 students.

Elective Courses

Engineering: 7th- 8th
Students will investigate science and engineering concepts through science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) activities. Some projects will incorporate computer design and the use of fabrication equipment to create a variety of products. Students will participate in guided investigations and open-ended problem solving activities, learn how to document their work, and communicate their solutions to others. A lab fee of about $25 will cover fabrication materials needed for the course.
Advanced Placement (AP) Biology: 9th - 12th
This course can be taken in place of Biology for the graduation requirement or as an elective for students in 10th-12th grade. Students have the option of taking an AP exam in May for college credit. This course is meant to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course that covers topics of the living world at all levels of organization. The goal is to provide the knowledge and analytical skills necessary to understand the field of biology.
For more information on this course go to: https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/ap-student/course/ap-biology-2012-course-exam-description.pdf
Prerequisites: B- or higher in Biology or two of the following: B- in Life Science; PSAT composite (average) score of 70% or higher; approval of the Science Department

Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry: 10th – 12th
This course can be taken in place of Chemistry for the graduation requirement or as an elective for students in 10th-12th grade. The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year, and uses a college level text signed out to 9th grade students after they have completed Biology at the end of the school year. This course will prepare students for success on the 2015 AP Chemistry Test. Students will complete a self-paced summer preparation program consisting of videos and online assignments covering chapters 1 – 3 and most of chapter 4. Students will be required to meet from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on August 4, 2014, and August 18, 2014. The morning sessions will be for instructor assistance and the afternoon sessions will be labs. Students will test on these chapters the second week in September. Students will complete many labs recommended by the College Board. (Note-It is highly recommended that students take Chemistry before this course. They will be more successful and this will eliminate the need for summer school.)
For more information on this course go to: http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/IN120085263_ChemistryCED_Effective_Fall_2013_lkd.pdf

Prerequisites: B- or higher in Chemistry or two of the following: B- in first semester Physical Science; PSAT composite (average) score of 70% or higher; approval of the Science Department.

Anatomy & Physiology: 10th-12th
This course will focus on the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics will include each of the body systems and will focus on the relationship between the physiological and anatomical features of each. Laboratory work will include dissection of preserved specimens, physiological experiments, and computer simulations to encourage understanding of material.
Prerequisites: Biology or AP Biology must be taken prior to enrolling in this course.

STEAM - A Passion Project: 11th-12th
The STEAM Passion Project is a problem based, project-oriented course for high school juniors and seniors. The project requires self-motivation and collaboration. The student comes up with a project, but he/she will be able to work independently or collaboratively.
The purpose of STEAM Project is to give students experience with the investigative process to become critical thinkers and writers and to develop presentation skills. Students will spend time researching, interviewing, writing, discussing, problem solving, and managing their project.
The project must:
     a. Be original, not a report of what someone else has done.
     b. Present the actual problem.
     c. Analyze possible solutions.
     d. Provide a solution to a specific problem.
     e. Publicly present the results (include peers, teachers, community, mentor, family, etc.)
     f. Keep a well maintained, complete, comprehensive Lab Notebook. Notebook and all                                    measurements must have the correct units and be accurate.
     g. Involve a mentor, expert, or other adults who will support you in your research and/or help direct               you to a solution.
     h. Produce a reasonable, practical and realistic recommendation that accomplishes one or more of              the following:
          1. Solves a problem resulting in “new” knowledge.
          2. Improves the human condition.
          3. Improves the environment.
          4. Applies technology in a new and innovative way.
     i. Support all claims with empirical evidence.
     j. Publish a formal paper.
     k. Incorporate at least four of the five - Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math in the project.

The aim is to improve the students ability to synthesize and integrate material from a range of disciplines while deploying diverse strategies in a problem solving context. The project relates theoretical knowledge and skills to practical problems while students work in real world situations to research and communicate results. This would be an excellent addition to a college applications and a resume.


Math and Science Academy
8430 Woodbury Crossing
Woodbury MN 55125

Main School Line: (651) 578-7507
Attendance Line: (651) 578-8061
Fax Line: (651) 578-7532
Hours: Click Here For Details
E-Mail: info@mnmsa.org

Our Sponsor

Liz Wynne - Director
(763) 557-6676 | liz.wynne2@gmail.com
P.O. Box 581639
Minneapolis, MN 55458-1639